48621 Hayes Rd
Shelby Park Office,
Bldg # 500
Shelby Twp., MI 48315
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Frequently Asked Questions

When Should My Child First See A Dentist?

“First visit by first birthday” sums it up. Your child should visit a Pediatric Dentist when the first tooth comes in, usually between 6 and 12 months of age. This visit will establish a dental home for your child. Early examination and preventive care will protect your child’s smile now and in the future.

Why So Early? What Dental Problems Could A Baby Have?

The most important reason is to begin a thorough prevention program. Dental problems can begin early. A big concern is Early Childhood Caries (formerly known as baby bottle tooth decay or nursing caries). Once a child’s diet includes anything besides breast-milk, erupted teeth are at risk for decay. The earlier the dental visit, the better the chance of preventing dental problems. Children with healthy teeth chew food easily and smile with confidence. Start your child now on a lifetime of good dental habits.

How Can I Prevent Tooth Decay From Nursing Or Using A Bottle?

At-will breast-feeding should be avoided after the first primary (baby) teeth begin to erupt and other sources of nutrition have been introduced. Children should not fall asleep with a bottle containing anything other than water. Drinking juice from a bottle should be avoided. Fruit juice should only be offered in a cup with meals or at snack time.

When Should Bottle-Feeding Be Stopped?

Children should be weaned from the bottle at 12-14 months of age.

Should I Worry About Thumb And Finger Sucking?

Thumb sucking is perfectly normal for infants; many stop by age 2. Prolonged thumb sucking can create crooked teeth or bite problems. If the habit continues beyond age 3, a professional evaluation is recommended. Your Pediatric Dentist will be glad to suggest ways to address a prolonged thumb sucking habit.

What Can I Do To Stop My Child's Habit of Thumb/Finger and Pacifier Sucking?

Most children stop sucking on thumbs, pacifiers or other objects on their own between 2 and 4 years of age. However, some children continue these habits over long periods of time. In these children, the upper front teeth may tip toward the lip or not come in properly. Frequent or intense habits over a prolonged period of time can affect the way the child’s teeth bite together, as well as the growth of the jaws and bones that support the teeth.

When your child is old enough to understand the possible results of a sucking habit, our Pediatric Dentist can encourage your child to stop, as well as talk about what happens to the teeth and jaws if your child does not stop. This advice, coupled with support from parents, helps most children quit. If this approach does not work, your Pediatric Dentist may recommend ways to change the behavior, including a mouth appliance that interferes with sucking habits

When Should I Start Cleaning My Baby’s Teeth?

The sooner the better! Starting at birth, clean your child’s gums with a soft infant toothbrush or cloth and water. As soon as the teeth begin to appear, start brushing twice daily using fluoridated toothpaste and a soft, age-appropriate sized toothbrush. Use a “smear” of toothpaste to brush the teeth of a child less than 2 years of age. For the 2-5 year old, dispense a “pea-size” amount of toothpaste and perform or assist your child’s tooth brushing. Remember that young children do not have the ability to brush their teeth effectively.

Any Advice On Teething?

From six months to age 3, your child may have tender gums when teeth erupt. Many children like a clean teething ring, cool spoon or cold wet washcloth. Some parents swear by a chilled ring; others simply rub the baby’s gums with a clean finger.

What Is A Healthy Diet For My Child?

A healthy diet is a balanced diet that naturally supplies all the nutrients your child needs to grow. A balanced diet is one that includes the following major food groups: Fruits Vegetables Grains Meat & Beans Milk.

How Does My Children's Diet Affect Their Dental Health?

They must have a balanced diet for their teeth to develop properly. They also need a balanced diet for healthy gum tissue around the teeth. Equally important, a diet high in certain kinds of carbohydrates, such as sugar and starches, may place your child at extra risk for tooth decay.

How Do I Make My Children's Diet Safe For Their Teeth?

First, be sure they have a balanced diet. Then, check how frequently they eat foods with sugar or starch in them. Foods with starch include breads, crackers, pasta and snacks, such as pretzels and potato chips. When checking for sugar, look beyond the sugar bowl and candy dish. A variety of foods contain one or more types of sugar, and all types of sugars can promote dental decay. Fruits, a few vegetables, and most milk products have at least one type of sugar.

Sugar can be found in many processed foods, even some that do not taste sweet. For example, a peanut butter and jelly sandwich not only has sugar in the jelly, but may have sugar added to the peanut butter. Sugar is also added to such condiments as ketchup and salad dressings.

Should My Child Give Up All Foods With Sugar Or Starch?

Certainly not! Many of these foods provide nutrients your child needs. You simply need to select and serve them wisely. A food with sugar or starch is safer for teeth if it is eaten with a meal, not as a snack. Sticky foods, such as dried fruit or toffee, are not easily washed away from the teeth by saliva, water or milk. Therefore, they have more cavity causing potential than foods more rapidly cleared from the teeth. Talk to your Pediatric Dentist about selecting and serving foods that protect your child’s dental health.

 

Does A Balanced Diet Assure That My Child Is Getting Enough Fluoride?

No. A balanced diet does not guarantee the proper amount of fluoride for the development and maintenance of your child’s teeth. If you do not live in a fluoridated community or have an ideal amount of naturally occurring fluoride in your well water, your child may need a fluoride supplement during the years of tooth development. Your Pediatric Dentist can help assess how much supplemental fluoride your child needs, based upon the amount of fluoride in your drinking water and other potential sources of fluoride.

My Youngest Is Not On Solid Foods Yet. Do You Have Any Suggestions For Him?

Do not nurse a young child to sleep or put him to bed with a bottle of milk, formula, juice or sweetened liquid. While a child sleeps, any un-swallowed liquid in the mouth feeds bacteria that produce acids and attack the teeth. Protect your child from severe tooth decay by putting him to bed with nothing more than a pacifier or bottle of water.

What Type Of Toothpaste Should My Child Use?

Your child should use toothpaste with fluoride and the American Dental Association Seal of Acceptance. Brushing twice a day (after breakfast and before bedtime) provides greater benefits than brushing once daily. Parents should dispense toothpaste to prevent their young children from swallowing too much. For children under two-years-old, use a smear of fluoridated toothpaste. For those aged 2 to 5 years, a pea-sized amount is recommended.

How Often Should A Child See The Dentist?

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends a dental check-up at least twice a year for most children. Some children need more frequent dental visits because of increased risk of tooth decay, unusual growth patterns or poor oral hygiene. Your Pediatric Dentist will let you know the best appointment schedule for your child.

Why Visit The Dentist Twice Per Year When My Child Has Never Had A Cavity?

Regular dental visits help your child stay cavity-free. Teeth cleanings remove debris that build up on the teeth, irritate the gums and cause decay. Fluoride treatments renew the fluoride content in the enamel, strengthening teeth and preventing cavities. Hygiene instructions improve your child’s brushing and flossing, leading to cleaner teeth and healthier gums.

Tooth decay is not the only reason for a dental visit. Your Pediatric Dentist provides an ongoing assessment of changes in your child’s oral health. For example, your child may need additional fluoride, dietary changes or sealants for ideal dental health. The Pediatric Dentist may identify orthodontic problems and suggest treatment to guide the teeth as they emerge in the mouth.

What Happens In A Dental Check-Up?

The Pediatric Dentist will review your child’s medical and dental history. He or she will gently examine your child’s teeth, oral tissues and jaws. The teeth will be cleaned and polished, followed by the application of a fluoride solution.

Our Pediatric Dentist will not just talk to you about dental health; he or she will talk to your child with easily understandable words, pictures and ideas. Your child will be motivated to take responsibility for a healthy smile.

Will X-Rays Be Taken At Every Appointment?

No. Pediatric dentists, acting in accordance with the guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, recommend X-rays only when necessary to protect your child’s dental health. For example, X-rays may be needed to diagnose tooth decay or abnormalities. Or, they may be required for orthodontic treatment. Our Pediatric Dentist will discuss the need for X-rays with you before any are taken.

How Can I Help My Child Enjoy Good Dental Health?

The following steps will help your child be part of the cavity-free generation:

  1. Beware of frequent snacking
  2. Brush effectively twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste
  3. Floss once a day
  4. Have sealants applied when appropriate
  5. Seek regular dental check-ups
  6. Assure proper fluoride through drinking water, fluoride products or fluoride supplements.
How Can I Help My Child with proper Diet for Dental Health?

Here are some tips for your child’s diet and dental health.

  1. Ask your Pediatric Dentist to help you assess your child’s diet.
  2. Shop smart! Do not routinely stock your pantry with sugary or starchy snacks. Buy fun foods just for special times.
  3. Limit the number of snack times; choose nutritious snacks.
  4. Provide a balanced diet, and save foods with sugar or starch for meal times.
  5. Do not put your young child to bed with a bottle of milk, formula or juice.
  6. If your child chews gum or sips soda, choose those without sugar.

Map of our Location

Contact Us

48621 Hayes Road
Shelby Park Office
Bldg. #500
Shelby Twp., MI 48315
(586) 247-5437
Fax: (586) 580-3431

Office Hours

Mon - 8:30am - 5:00pm
Tue - 8:30am - 5:00pm
Wed - 10:00am- 6:00pm
Thu - 8:30am - 5:00pm
Fri - Selective Fridays
Sat - Selective Saturdays
Sun - Closed